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The Irish Thread

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Kitkat
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Thu 03 May 2018, 11:49

Jamboree wrote:
The highlight of my first time in Dublin, on holiday as a kid when we stayed at my grandma's house in Cabinteely, was counting the steps as we climbed round and round the inside of the Pillar to reach the top where we enjoyed a spectacular view of the whole of Dublin and the surrounding mountains.

I didn't know you had an Irish connection, Jamboree. Very Happy  

Cabinteely.  I know it well!  Not terribly far from where I lived in Newtownmountkennedy.  The bus into Dublin passed right through the main street in Cabinteely.  My secondary school was in Bray (Loreto Convent), about half way between the two.  Bray is in Co. Wicklow.  Once you passed through the main street in Bray, the far end was the beginning of Dublin county.

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johnveggy
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by johnveggy on Thu 26 Jul 2018, 21:08

Kitkat wrote:This World
Ireland's Lost Babies


First shown on BBC2: 17 Sep 2014 - Duration 59 mins  

Watch on BBC iPlayer  - Available for  [no longer available to watch]

In 2013 the movie Philomena was shown in cinemas across the world and earned four Oscar nominations. The film was based on the true story of Philomena Lee, who was forced by the Catholic Church to give up her illegitimate son for adoption, and detailed her journey with journalist Martin Sixsmith to find her child 50 years later.

In the weeks and months after the film went out, Martin was contacted by other mothers who had their own stories to tell. Now, Martin Sixsmith goes on a journey to investigate the Irish Catholic Church's role in an adoption trade which saw thousands of illegitimate children taken from their mothers and sent abroad, often with donations to the Church flowing in the other direction. In Ireland and in America, Martin hears the moving stories of the parents and children whose lives were changed forever and discovers evidence that prospective parents were not properly vetted - sometimes with tragic consequences.
 

The above documentary is no longer available, but you can watch the film 'Philomena' here:
[Link deleted by Admin]
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Kitkat
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Fri 27 Jul 2018, 08:19

johnveggy wrote:
The above documentary is no longer available, but you can watch the film 'Philomena' here:
[Link deleted by Admin]


WARNING: Please note that I have deleted the link supplied by new member johnveggy in the above post.

By all means, 'Philomena' is a film I would highly recommend for people to watch, BUT - there are many links put up on YouTube etc leading to downloads/streaming to view the film. These links are to be avoided, as there is no guarantee of their security or authenticity.

The film has been broadcast on several occasions on TV in recent times. My advice would be to wait until it comes on the telly again and definitely watch it then - in a safe and secure environment. (Last shown on BBC2 on Sat 24 Feb 2018 @ 22:00).
If it becomes available to watch again on BBC iPlayer for a limited period, that IS a safe and legitimate environment:

Currently:
This programme is not currently available on BBC iPlayer
Philomena (1 hour 31 mins)

Drama recounting the true story of Philomena Lee, a Catholic woman who gives birth out of wedlock in 1950s Ireland. Abandoned by her family, she is forced to live in an abbey, where the nuns sell her infant child for adoption. Philomena keeps her secret for fifty years, before eventually enlisting the help of jaded journalist Martin Sixsmith in tracking down her estranged son.
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Kitkat
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Who gives a .... Let's have a hooley!

Post by Kitkat on Mon 06 Aug 2018, 15:50

Ah sure, who cares if the flight is delayed ... any auld excuse for a bit of a session ...

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Kitkat
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The craic was good in Cricklewood and they wouldn't leave The Crown ....

Post by Kitkat on Thu 11 Oct 2018, 12:40

'The craic was good in Cricklewood'



and it still is ...  Very Happy    'The Crown' mentioned in the build-up to the song above, is still going strong, though it's a bit more refined nowadays (thank goodness!) - cos a few of us of the family that are living here in England will be going there for our Christmas Day dinner this year.  (Lunch actually, but we still call it dinner  pirat ) :

Christmas at The Crown
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Kitkat
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Wed 21 Nov 2018, 18:00

Already 13,326 views!

Ireland have beaten the All Blacks for the first time ever on home soil. yay
Here is the amazing Haka war dance in Landsdowne Road, and Ireland's response:



Ireland 16 - New Zealand (All Blacks) 9
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lar-lar
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Thu 22 Nov 2018, 22:45

What are you having off that menu then? wine
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lar-lar
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Thu 22 Nov 2018, 22:51

This would be my choice...

Warm Somerset brie & wild cranberry tart with baby leaf salad
Slow roasted Norfolk turkey breast, glazed loin of bacon & festive trimmings
Chocolate clementine mousse, orange sauce & caramel ice cream


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Kitkat
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Fri 23 Nov 2018, 19:09

lar-lar wrote:What are you having off that menu then? wine

I'll be going for:

  • Pumpkin squash & corn soup with Welsh rarebit croutons
  • Slow roasted Norfolk turkey breast, glazed loin of bacon & festive trimmings
  • Christmas pudding, Irish whisky sauce & vanilla ice cream


(One of our party traditionally never normally bothers with dessert, so I'm hoping ... planning that they will order the yummy looking
• Tiramisu slice, Baileys ice cream & toffee sauce -
and maybe pass it over my way!) Wink
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lar-lar
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Sat 24 Nov 2018, 22:20

I do like Christmas pudding but I haven't had it for years. That's about to change! That's a nice menu though.
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Kitkat
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The Magdalene Laundries

Post by Kitkat on Sat 08 Dec 2018, 16:13

There is already a thread somewhere on the forum all about the Magdalene Laundries, together with various films and documentaries made about these dreadful places - but I can't find it now, so I'm placing this here.
Today's article from The Free Dictionary is a comprehensive up-to-date report on the subject, including links to further resources on the subject.  As this will be automatically changed tomorrow, I want to capture it before that happens, so here it is - its temporary home until I can find our original thread to add on to:

Magdalene Asylums

Named after Mary Magdalene,who, according to Christian tradition, repented her sins and became one of Jesus' closest followers.
Magdalene asylums were institutions largely run by various orders of the Catholic Church to rehabilitate so-called fallen women - prostitutes, unwed mothers, even girls considered too promiscuous or flirtatious - through hard labour and penance.  Many were admitted against their will, and some allege that they were subject to abuse.  When was the last of these asylums closed?  More...




Unidentified Magdalene Laundry in Ireland, c. early twentieth century, reproduced from Frances Finnegan,Do Penance or Perish (Fig. 9), Congrave Press, 2001

Magdalene asylums were slave labor laundries from the 18th to the late-20th centuries ostensibly to house "fallen women", a term used to imply female sexual promiscuity. Asylums for such girls and women and others considered to be of poor moral character, such as prostitutes, operated throughout Europe and North America for much of the nineteenth and well into the twentieth century. London's Magdalen Asylum was active from 1758 to 1966.[1] The first such asylum in Ireland opened on Leeson Street in Dublin in 1765, founded by Lady Arabella Denny. There are no precise figures for the number of girls who slaved in the eight Magdalene laundries, run by the Good Shepherd Sisters, in twentieth century Australia because Good Shepherd has not released their records. As a result of the 2004 Federal Senate report "Forgotten Australians"[2] it is known that the Good Shepherd laundries in Australia acted as prisons for the girls who were forced to labor in workhouses laundering linen for local hospitals or commercial premises. The report also described the conditions as characterized by inedible food, unhygienic living conditions and little or no education. In 2008, in Federal Parliament, Senator Andrew Murray likened the Convent of the Good Shepherd 'The Pines', Adelaide to a prisoner-of-war camp.[3]
Initially the mission of the asylums was to rehabilitate women back into society, but by the early twentieth century the homes had become increasingly punitive and prison-like. In most asylums, the inmates were required to undertake hard physical labour, including laundry and needle work. They endured a daily regimen that included long periods of prayer and enforced silence.[4]
In Ireland, such asylums were known as Magdalene laundries where it is estimated that, since their inception, up to 30,000 women had been incarcerated.[5][6] The last such institution in Ireland closed in 1996.[6][7][8]

Origins




Magdalene Laundry in England, early twentieth century, from Frances Finnegan, Do Penance or Perish (Fig. 5) Congrave Press, 2001

The Dublin Magdalen Asylum in lower Leeson Street was the first such institution in Ireland. Founded in 1765 by Lady Arabella Denny,[9] it admitted only Protestant girls.[10] In 1918 the home became a children's home and adoption society.[11] After its closure, the Bethany Home, founded in 1921, provided similar refuge services for Protestant "fallen women".[citation needed] The first Catholic home was founded in Cork in 1809.[11]
In Belfast the Church of Ireland run Ulster Magdalene Asylum was founded in 1839 on Donegall Pass, while parallel institutions were run by Catholics on Ormeau Road and by Presbyterians on Whitehall Parade.[12]
Magdalene asylums grew out of the Evangelical rescue movement in the United Kingdom during the nineteenth century, whose formal goal was to rehabilitate prostitutes. In Ireland, the institutions were named for St. Mary Magdalene.[6]
The Magdalene movement in Ireland was appropriated by the Catholic Church following Catholic Emancipation in 1829 and the homes, which were initially intended to be short-term refuges, increasingly turned into long-term institutions.[citation needed] Penitents were required to work, primarily in laundries, since the facilities were self-supporting and not funded by the state or religious denominations.
As the Magdalene movement became increasingly distant from the original idea of the rescue movement—finding alternative work for prostitutes who could not find regular employment because of their background—the asylums became increasingly prison-like. Supervising nuns were instructed to encourage the women into penance, rather than merely berating them and blocking their escape attempts.
The Congregation of the Sisters of Misericorde is described by the Catholic Encyclopedia: "In receiving patients no discrimination is made in regard to religion, colour, or nationality. After their convalescence, those who desire to remain in the home are placed under a special sister and are known as "Daughters of St. Margaret". They follow a certain rule of life but contract no religious obligations. Should they desire to remain in the convent, after a period of probation, they are allowed to become Magdalens and eventually make the vows of the Magdalen order. The congregation celebrated its fiftieth anniversary 16 January 1898."[13]


Conditions


Asylum records show that in the early history of the Magdalene movement, many women entered and left the institutions of their own accord, sometimes repeatedly. Lu Ann De Cunzo wrote in her book, Reform, Respite, Ritual: An Archaeology of Institutions; The Magdalene Society of Philadelphia, 1800-1850,[14] that the women in Philadelphia's asylum "sought a refuge and a respite from disease, the prison or almshouse, unhappy family situations, abusive men and dire economic circumstances." Though the institutions were meant to be a refuge for women, some were subjected to physical, psychological, sexual and emotional abuse. Many women felt they needed the support of the institutions to survive, since the sisters strove to make them feel that the reasons for their refuge were their own fault.
According to historian, Frances Finnegan, because many had a background as prostitutes, inmates (who were called "children") were regarded as "in need of penitence," and until the 1970s were required to address all staff members as "mother" regardless of age. To enforce order and maintain a monastic atmosphere, the inmates were required to observe strict silence for much of the day, while corporal punishment was common.
As the phenomenon became more widespread, it extended beyond prostitution to petty criminals, orphans, mentally retarded women and abused girls, despite popular perception unmarried pregnant women were typically not admitted.[15] Even young girls who were considered too promiscuous and flirtatious, or too beautiful, were sent to an asylum by their families. This paralleled the practice in state-run asylums in Britain and Ireland in the same period, where many people with alleged "social dysfunction" were committed to asylums. Without a family member on the outside who could vouch for them, many incarcerated individuals stayed in the asylums for the rest of their lives, many taking religious vows.
Given Ireland's historically conservative sexual values, Magdalene asylums were a generally accepted social institution until well into the second half of the twentieth century. They disappeared with changes in sexual mores—or, as Finnegan suggests, as they ceased to be profitable: "Possibly the advent of the washing machine has been as instrumental in closing these laundries as have changing attitudes."[16]


Public scandal


Publicity and documentaries


The existence of the Irish asylums was not well known until 1993 when an order of nuns, Sisters of Our Lady of Charity, in Dublin sold part of their convent to a real-estate developer.[6] The remains of 155 inmates who had been buried in unmarked graves on the property were exhumed and, except for one, cremated and reburied in a mass grave in Glasnevin Cemetery. This triggered a public scandal and became national news.[6] In 1999, Mary Norris, Josephine McCarthy and Mary-Jo McDonagh, all asylum inmates, gave accounts of their treatment. The 1997 Channel 4 documentary Sex in a Cold Climate interviewed former inmates of Magdalene Asylums who testified to continued sexual, psychological and physical abuse while being isolated from the outside world for an indefinite amount of time. Allegations about the conditions in the convents and the treatment of the inmates were made into an award-winning 2002 film The Magdalene Sisters, written and directed by Peter Mullan.[17]
In June 2011, Mary Raftery wrote in the The Irish Times that in the early 1940s, some Irish state institutions, such as the army, switched from commercial laundries to "institutional laundries" (Magdalene laundries).[18] At the time, there was concern in the Dáil that workers in commercial laundries were losing jobs because of the switch to institutional laundries.[18] Oscar Traynor, Minister for Defence, said the contracts with the Magdalene laundries “contain a fair wages clause,” though the women in those laundries did not receive wages.[18]
The Irish Times revealed that a ledger listed Áras an Uachtaráin, Guinness, Clerys, the Gaiety Theatre, Dr Steevens' Hospital, the Bank of Ireland, the Department of Defence, the Departments of Agriculture and Fisheries, CIÉ, Portmarnock Golf Club, Clontarf Golf Club and several leading hotels amongst those who used a Magdalene laundry.[19] This was unearthed by Steven O' Riordan, a young Irish film-maker who directed and produced a documentary, The Forgotten Maggies.[20] It is the only Irish-made documentary on the subject and was launched at The Galway Film Fleadh 2009.[20] It was screened on the Irish television station TG4 in 2011, attracting over 360,000 viewers. The documentary's website notes that a group called Magdalene Survivors Together was set up after the release of the documentary, because so many Magdalene women came forward after its airing. The women who appeared in the documentary were the first Magdalene women to meet with Irish government officials. They brought national and international attention to the subject.[citation needed]


Inquiry into child abuse


In May 2009, the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse released a 2,000-page report recording claims from hundreds of Irish residents that they were physically, sexually, or emotionally abused as children between the 1930s and the 1990s in a network of state-administered and church-run residential schools meant to care for the poor, the vulnerable and the unwanted.[21] The alleged abuse was by nuns, priests and non-clerical staff and helpers.[22] The allegations of abuse cover many Catholic (Magdalene), Protestant (Bethany) and State-run Irish Industrial schools.
The commission stated:
There were two types of inquiry, one drawing on contested evidence (Investigation Committee) and the other on uncontested evidence (Confidential Committee), which reported to the commission. The commission received evidence from more than 1,500 witnesses who attended or were residents as children in schools and care facilities in the state, particularly industrial and reformatory schools.[23]
Since 2001, the Irish government has acknowledged that women in the Magdalene laundries were victims of abuse. However, the Irish government has resisted calls for investigation and proposals for compensation; it maintains the laundries were privately run and abuses at the laundries are outside the government's remit.[6] In contrast to these claims, evidence exists that Irish courts routinely sent women convicted of petty crimes to the laundries, the government awarded lucrative contracts to the laundries without any insistence on protection and fair treatment of their workers, and Irish state employees helped keep laundry facilities stocked with workers by bringing women to work there and returning escaped workers.[6]
Notwithstanding the investigations instigated by the government in the Republic of Ireland, similar investigations have yet to be instigated in Northern Ireland and worldwide.


International law


Having lobbied the government of Ireland for two years to investigate the history of the Magdalene laundries, advocacy group Justice for Magdalenes presented its case to the United Nations Committee Against Torture,[6] alleging that the conditions within the Magdalene laundries and the exploitation of their labourers amounted to human-rights violations.[6] On 6 June 2011, the panel urged Ireland to "investigate allegations that for decades women and girls sent to work in Catholic laundries were tortured." [24][25] In response the Irish government set up a committee chaired by Senator Martin McAleese, to establish the facts of the Irish state's involvement with the Magdalene laundries.[26]


2013 publication of inquiry report


Following the 18-month inquiry, the committee published[27][28][29] its report on 5 February 2013, finding "significant" state collusion in the admission of thousands of women into the institutions.[30][31][32][33] The report found over 11,000 women had entered laundries since 1922.[15] Significant levels of verbal abuse to women inside was reported but there were no suggestions of regular physical or sexual abuse.[15] Elderly survivors said they would go on hunger strike over the failure of successive Irish governments to set up a financial redress scheme for the thousands of women enslaved there.[34] Taoiseach Enda Kenny, while professing sorrow at the abuses revealed, did not issue an immediate apology, prompting criticism from other members of Dáil Éireann. Kenny promised "there would be a full Dáil debate on the report in two weeks' time when people had an opportunity to read the report". Survivors were critical that an apology had not been immediately forthcoming.[35]


Official state apology and compensation package


On 19 February 2013, Kenny officially issued a full state apology to the women of the Magdalene Laundries.[36] He described the laundries as "the nation's shame" and "Therefore, I, as Taoiseach, on behalf of the State, the government and our citizens deeply regret and apologise unreservedly to all those women for the hurt that was done to them, and for any stigma they suffered, as a result of the time they spent in a Magdalene Laundry".[37][38]
The Taoiseach also outlined part of the compensation package to be offered to victims of the Magdalene Laundries. He stated: "That’s why the Government has today asked the President of the Law Reform Commission Judge John Quirke to undertake a three month review and to make recommendations as to the criteria that should be applied in assessing the help that the government can provide in the areas of payments and other supports, including medical card, psychological and counselling services and other welfare needs." [39]


Legacy


Literature and reportage



  • Do Penance or Perish: Magdalen Asylums in Ireland by historian Frances Finnegan published (hardback) Congrave Press Ireland, 2001; and (paperback) Oxford University Press, 2004. The first book to be published on the topic and still the definitive study, it is based on 21 years' meticulous[citation needed] research. Using a wide range of sources including the Annals and Penitents' Registers of the Good Shepherd archives, the book examines the history, purpose and inmates of these grim institutions. A courageous exposure of the Magdalen Movement, it contains unique illustrations, including the two reproduced above. ISBN 0-9540921-0-4.
  • James M. Smith's Ireland's Magdalene Laundries and the Nation's Architecture of Containment won the 2007 Donald Murphy Prize for a Distinguished First Book from the American Conference for Irish Studies. ISBN 978-0-268-04127-4
  • Rachel Dilworth's The Wild Rose Asylum: Poems of the Magdalen Laundries of Ireland, the 2008 winner of the Akron Poetry Prize, is a collection of poems based on the Magdalene Laundries.[40]
  • In the Shadow of Eden is an award-winning[41] short memoir by Rachael Romero.[42] Using vintage footage and photos of what led up to her incarceration in the Convent of the Good Shepherd (Magdalene) Laundries in South Australia, Romero outlines her experience there.
  • For The Love of My Mother by J.P. Rodgers tells the story of his Irish mother, born into a life of poverty and detained at the age of two for begging in the streets. Bridget Rodgers spent the next 30 years of her life locked away in one institution or another, including the Magdalen Laundries.
  • The Magadalen Martyrs is a 2003 crime novel written by Ken Bruen. In the third episode of Bruen's Jack Taylor series, Jack Taylor is given a mission: "Find the Angel of the Magdalene," actually a devil incarnate nicknamed Lucifer, a woman who "helped" the unfortunate martyrs incarcerated in the infamous laundry.
  • Kathy's Story by Kathy O'Beirne alleges that she suffered physical and sexual abuse in a Magdalene laundry in Ireland.
  • Kathy's Real Story by journalist Hermann Kelly, published by Prefect Press in 2007, alleges that O'Beirne's allegations are false.[43]
  • "Magdalene Laundry Survivor. The Irish government admits it played a major role in forcing women into work camps." on the CBC radio show As It Happens on February 5, 2013. Audio here:[44]


Film and stage



  • The Magdalene Sisters - a 2002 film written and directed by Peter Mullan. This film was a critical success but is not considered historically accurate.[45]
  • Sex in a Cold Climate - a 1998 documentary[citation needed] directed by Steve Humphries (historical consultant: Frances Finnegan) presenting interviews of four women interred in various Magdalene asylums and orphanages because of out-of-wedlock pregnancies, being sexually assaulted, or just being "too pretty."
  • Les Blanchisseuses de Magdalene - a France 3/Sunset Presse documentary 1998[citation needed]. (historical consultant: Frances Finnegan)
  • The Magdalen Whitewash, a play about the laundries, was written by Valerie Goodwin and performed by the Coolmine Drama group at the Draíocht Arts Centre in Dublin, in 2002.[46]
  • Eclipsed, a play about the Magdalene Laundries, was written[citation needed] by Patricia Burke-Brogan in the 1980s. Burke-Brogan had worked in the laundries in the 1960s. Eclipsed was first performed in 1992.

The Quane's Laundry, a play about the Magdalene laundries,set in Dublin in 1900 was written by Imelda Murphy 2007


Music




See also




References


Further reading



  • Finnegan, Frances (2001). Do Penance or Perish: A Study of Magdalene Asylums in Ireland. Piltown, Co. Kilkenny: Congrave Press. ISBN 0-9540921-0-4.
  • Raftery, Mary; and Eoin O'Sullivan (1999). Suffer the Little Children: The Inside Story of Ireland's Industrial Schools. Dublin: New Island. ISBN 1-874597-83-9.
  • Smith, James M (2008). Ireland's Magdalen Laundries and the Nation's architecture of containment. Manchester: Manchester University Press. ISBN 978-0-7190-7888-0.


External links



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