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The Video of the Week now showing on Light After Life's portal page is: 'Near Death Experiences' (5th Dimension: Science Documentary)

Latest topics

» Keep a Word - Delete a Word
by Whiskers Today at 13:48

» Migraine is more than 'just a headache'
by Jamboree Today at 09:04

» Silly Endings.
by Whiskers 14th April 2018, 21:32

» View all new posts since last visit - at a glance
by Kitkat 9th April 2018, 11:36

» Ronnie Corbett in an opera spoof?
by bimbow 7th April 2018, 23:02

» Henry and Baloo leave their pawprints in our hearts
by Whiskers 6th April 2018, 21:55

» Orkney: When the Boat Comes In
by Kitkat 6th April 2018, 16:30

» The Worst Construction Mistakes Ever
by Whiskers 5th April 2018, 12:00

» Nature
by Whiskers 4th April 2018, 12:00

» Stardust on the Moon
by Stardust 4th April 2018, 11:15

» Wildlife - death of Sudan, last male White Northern Rhino
by Stardust 4th April 2018, 09:36

» Stephen Hawking's warnings: What he predicted for the future
by Whiskers 3rd April 2018, 22:05

» Facebook links
by Stardust 3rd April 2018, 11:39

» A Granma's Anagrams
by Whiskers 3rd April 2018, 11:23

» Is Peer Review all it's cracked up to be?
by Stardust 3rd April 2018, 10:02

» Guess the word
by Jamboree 31st March 2018, 16:09

» Question for Forum Bloggers (Poll)
by Kitkat 30th March 2018, 23:05

» Happy Easter
by Kitkat 30th March 2018, 23:01

» Wild Scotland
by Whiskers 29th March 2018, 20:03

» A blink's as good as a smile
by Kitkat 27th March 2018, 21:08

» World's oldest cave art
by Stardust 27th March 2018, 11:23

» Kemerovo fire kills at least 64
by Stardust 27th March 2018, 10:52

» Blogthings: The Labyrinth Test
by Stardust 26th March 2018, 17:10

» Cannes Film Festival 2018 - Red Carpet selfies banned
by Stardust 26th March 2018, 13:33

» The Irish Thread
by Stardust 26th March 2018, 10:33

» True hero: Lt Col Arnaud Beltrame
by Kitkat 25th March 2018, 22:27

» Books
by Kitkat 24th March 2018, 16:48

» Cosmic beauty
by Stardust 23rd March 2018, 11:26

» Blogthings: The Easter egg personality test.
by Kitkat 23rd March 2018, 10:29

» Blogthings: What part of Spring are you?
by Stardust 23rd March 2018, 10:13

» So you think you know cats... read on
by Stardust 23rd March 2018, 09:43

» Feather by the sea.
by Stardust 23rd March 2018, 08:59

» Freecycle.org
by Kitkat 22nd March 2018, 13:09

» Blogthings: what forest animal are you?
by Whiskers 21st March 2018, 16:40

» Bureaucats: Whiskers in the Workplace
by Whiskers 21st March 2018, 15:45

» Wildlife - lions eat the poacher
by Whiskers 21st March 2018, 15:43

» Wildlife - San Francisco to ban sale of fur
by Stardust 21st March 2018, 11:48

» The Beast from the East?
by Stardust 21st March 2018, 10:44

» Delicious and nutritious
by Stardust 21st March 2018, 10:19

» April Fools
by Stardust 21st March 2018, 07:57

» Your man with the glasses ...
by Kitkat 20th March 2018, 13:36

» Message in a bottle
by Stardust 20th March 2018, 09:39

» The cartoon thread.
by Whiskers 11th March 2018, 13:43

» Upper Back Pain
by Kitkat 10th March 2018, 16:14

» [solved] Yahoo Mail down - again!
by Kitkat 9th March 2018, 23:00

» Concerns with Wikipedia (and "filter bubbles") - Guerrilla Skeptics at Large
by Kitkat 3rd March 2018, 23:29

» Wonderful images - fabulous music
by bimbow 1st March 2018, 17:23

» The Beast from the East
by Kitkat 1st March 2018, 14:01

» MPs call for ESA death statistics to be published (Calum's List)
by Kitkat 28th February 2018, 17:06

» Invasion of the sex-craved spiders! EEK!
by lar-lar 25th February 2018, 21:32

» Daughter fundraising to save her terminally ill mother
by Jamboree 18th February 2018, 11:53

» Kitkat's KK Blog
by Kitkat 15th February 2018, 21:36

» Poetry from the heart.
by Jamboree 12th February 2018, 07:46

» A Day in The Life of a Dictator - Documentary
by Jamboree 12th February 2018, 07:21

» A coconut in a coffin?
by Whiskers 9th February 2018, 20:35

» Limericks
by bimbow 8th February 2018, 21:22

» Is there a Cathy in the place?
by Kitkat 1st February 2018, 19:17

» Chinese New Year
by Stardust 1st February 2018, 14:17

» What's your emergency?
by Whiskers 27th January 2018, 13:09

» YouTube free-loading vlogger gets a much needed lesson in reality
by Whiskers 22nd January 2018, 20:17

» Three-month-old baby says "hello"
by Kitkat 13th January 2018, 15:00

» 60 Christmas traditions around the world
by Kitkat 30th December 2017, 21:58

» Simon's Cat
by Kitkat 26th December 2017, 16:27

» A new(ish) song for Christmas.
by Whiskers 24th December 2017, 13:49

» Merry Christmas
by Whiskers 24th December 2017, 13:37

» The Christmas Thread
by Kitkat 20th December 2017, 21:22

» A reader's response to your article on food waste
by Whiskers 18th December 2017, 14:35

» Downward Dog
by Kitkat 4th December 2017, 21:35

» A very young Bee Gees treat
by Whiskers 29th November 2017, 16:35

» Prime cheek!
by Kitkat 28th November 2017, 09:32

» The life and achievements of Dr Elsie Inglis
by Kitkat 26th November 2017, 09:14

» Hidden disabilities: Pain beneath the surface
by Kitkat 21st November 2017, 21:20

» Scary photos
by Kitkat 19th November 2017, 12:50

» The 7-year-old neuroscientist wowing the internet
by Kitkat 16th November 2017, 10:03

» The cat killer stalking suburbia
by Whiskers 6th November 2017, 15:53

» It's that time again .....
by Kitkat 29th October 2017, 00:21

» Happy Halloween!
by Stardust 25th October 2017, 08:37

» Love makes the world go round
by Stardust 25th October 2017, 08:00

» Need help with homework (Hall Effect)
by Kitkat 24th October 2017, 12:18

» Well hello there!
by Whiskers 23rd October 2017, 23:53

» Madeleine McCann investigation continues ...
by Whiskers 23rd October 2017, 23:43

» Famous Youtubers... Do you watch them? Do you dislike them?
by Jamboree 23rd October 2017, 00:44

» Control your television with any object
by loner55 16th October 2017, 10:32

» Fahrenheit 451
by loner55 16th October 2017, 10:26

» HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Feather!
by Jamboree 15th October 2017, 17:43

» A walk through Dominica, hours after Hurricane Maria
by Kitkat 15th October 2017, 12:48

» SKEPS Forum
by Kitkat 8th October 2017, 22:00

» Quotes about Lifestye
by Whiskers 7th October 2017, 15:25

» Songs from the heart
by Stardust 20th September 2017, 20:55

» Bodies of 'hundreds' of children buried in mass grave
by mac 19th September 2017, 12:25

» Psychics didn't foresee THAT coming!
by mac 16th September 2017, 15:14

» Number 7777
by Kitkat 14th September 2017, 14:10

» 'Messy' mum barred from pub
by Stardust 11th September 2017, 16:17

» [solved] Multiquote ?
by Whiskers 11th September 2017, 11:13

» Why men are happier people???
by Stardust 8th September 2017, 20:10

» Pink rainbow
by Stardust 8th September 2017, 15:46

» Barking mad!
by Stardust 8th September 2017, 15:44

» Surviving in Libya
by Kitkat 7th September 2017, 22:52

» The Forum Café
by Kitkat 7th September 2017, 14:53

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Jamboree (313)
 
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The Cat's Pyjamas

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Kitkat
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To cast the first stone

Post by Kitkat on 5th January 2017, 12:40

TO CAST THE FIRST STONE

To be first to criticize, to find fault,to start a quarrel, or to cast aspersions on someone's character.  In biblical times, the barbaric custom of capital punishment was to pelt heretics, adulteresses and criminals with stones and rocks in a public place.

The phrase is from John 8:7, spoken by Jesus to the Scribes and Pharisees who brought before him a woman caught in adultery.  They said that according to the law of Moses, she should be stoned to death, to which Jesus replied: 'He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.'


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To clear the decks

Post by Kitkat on 6th January 2017, 12:53

TO CLEAR THE DECKS

To remove everything not required, especially when preparing for action; hence to prepare for some task by removing the extraneous or irrelevant.

This is a nautical phrase and alludes to a sailing ship preparing for battle, when anything in the way of the guns and their crews, or that might burn or splinter, or that was not lashed down, was removed from the usually cluttered decks so that no untethered articles would roll about and injure the seamen during the battle.

This saying is used in many contexts, such as clearing the table of fod and dishes, or preparing the house to receive guests.

'Deck' appears in many commonly used phrases, among them 'to hit the deck' - to fall over, usually to escape injury - or to 'deck someone' (to hit them and knock them to the floor).

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To be in a cleft stick

Post by Kitkat on 7th January 2017, 09:32

TO BE IN A CLEFT STICK

A figurative phrase meaning to be in a tight place or dilemma with no room for manoeuvre, neither backwards nor forwards.

The expression may come from the verb 'to cleave', which has two directly opposite meanings: one being to stick to or adhere, and the other to split, chop or break along a grain or line of cleavage.

The first recordd use of the phrase with its figurative meaning was by the poet William Cowpeer (1731-1800) in 1782:  'We are squeezed to death, between the two sides of that sort of alternative which is commonly called a cleft stick.'

A cleft stick was often used in the eighteenth century to catch snakes.  The form of torture inflicted on Ariel by the witch Sycorax in Shakespeare's The Tempest (1611) was to imprison him in the trunk of a cleft pine tree.

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Clean round the bend

Post by Kitkat on 8th January 2017, 13:32

CLEAN ROUND THE BEND

Completely crazy or eccentric.  The phrase was described by F. Bowen in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1929 as 'an old naval term for anybody who is mad'.

In a neat play on words, the phrase has been used to advertise the lavatory cleaner Harpic since the 1930s:  'It cleans right round the bend.'

The word 'clean' is used in many different ways to describe something complete, pure, unmarked or unreserved - for instance, 'clean bowled', 'to make a clean break' or 'to make a clean breast of it'.

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To climb on the bandwagon

Post by Kitkat on 9th January 2017, 11:25

TO CLIMB ON THE BANDWAGON

To declare support for a popular movement or trend, usually without believing in the movement or trend.

The expression is believed to have originated in the Southern states of America, probably dating from the first presidential campaign of William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) in 1892, when candidates for political office would parade through the streets, led by a band of musicians performing on a large horse-drawn dray.

As a publicity stunt, the local candidate would mount the wagon as it passed and ride through his constituency in an attempt to gain personal support from the voters.  Perhaps unsurprisingly, Bryan never won the presidency, losing to McKinley in 1896 and 1900, and to Taft in 1908.


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For the high jump

Post by Kitkat on 10th January 2017, 16:49

FOR THE HIGH JUMP

English slang for being in big trouble, also known these days as 'deep doo-doo' or 'deep shit'.  It usually implies that dismissal or serious punishment are on the cards.

The allusion is to the hanging of a convicted criminal - the gallows being 'the high jump' - which was the former British judicial method for capital punishment.


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To have a chip on one's shoulder

Post by Kitkat on 11th January 2017, 11:21

TO HAVE A CHIP ON ONE'S SHOULDER

To display an inferiority complex, to perceive oneself as an underdog, to have a grievance, often unjustifiably.

The expression is believed to have originated in America in about 1840 and may allude to a game of dare, in which a man challenges another to dislodge a chip - as in piece of wood, not French fry - he carries on his shoulder.

In American parlance, a chip was also a figurative term for consequences, and so the phrase may be a warning to an adversary not to aim too high.

There is an ancient proverb, 'Hew not too high lest chips fall in thine eye.'  By the late sixteenth century, this health-and-safety warning had become something of a challenge, a dare to a fearless woodcutter to look high up without regard to any falling chips of wood.

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To have a field day

Post by Kitkat on 12th January 2017, 10:13

TO HAVE A FIELD DAY

A figurative expression for a day or occasion or time of particular excitement, often a day away from the usual routine.

The phrase is in fact a military term for a day when troops have manoeuvres, exercises or reviews - out in the field.  (The military refer to the area or sphere of operations as 'the field'.)

The term is now used more generally to mean a time of enjoyment, or making the most of things; we might say that the tabloid newspapers would 'have a field day' if they got hold of a particularly salacious story.

In the US Navy, 'a field day' is a day devoted to cleaning the ship in preparation for inspection.

Schoolchildren, meanwhile, enjoy field trips, on which they travel away from school, particularly to study geography.


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Out of the frying pan into the fire

Post by Kitkat on 13th January 2017, 10:39

TO JUMP OUT OF THE FRYING PAN INTO THE FIRE

To leap from one bad predicament to another which is as bad or even worse.

In English, the phrase can be traced back to about 1530 when, in the course of a religious argument, Sir Thomas More, Henry VIII's Lord Chancellor and author of Utopia, said that William Tyndale (1494-1536), translator of the Bible into English, had 'featly conuayed himself out of the frying panne fayre into the fyre'.

Unfortunately, both men met a gruesome end.  Sir Thomas More was hanged as a traitor in 1535 for refusing to approve the marriage between Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, while Tyndale was publicly strangled and burned as a heretic in 1536.
 

Most languages have an equivalent phrase; the French have tomber de la poêle dans le feu - 'fall from the frying pan into the fire' - from which the English is probably translated.  The ancient Greeks had, 'out of the smoke into the flame'; the Italians and Portuguese, 'to fall from the frying pan into the coals'; and the Gaelic is 'out of the cauldron into the fire'.

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To keep one's powder dry

Post by Kitkat on 14th January 2017, 09:46

TO KEEP ONE'S POWDER DRY

To be prepared for action, but preserve one's resources until they are really needed.

The phrase comes from a saying attributed to Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658), and the powder is, of course, gunpowder, which will not ignite if wet, or even damp.

During his savage Irish campaign of 1649, Cromwell is said to have concluded a speech to his troops, who were about to cross the River Slaney before attacking Wexford, with the rousing words, 'Put your trust in God, my boys, and keep your power dry.'

There is no contemporary recording of his use of this phrase, however, and it is possible that it was coined later by the soldier and historian Valentine Blacker (1738-1823) in his poem 'Oliver's Advice', which attributed the line to Cromwell.

 angry

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Kiss of death

Post by Kitkat on 16th January 2017, 13:31

KISS OF DEATH

This phrase derives from Judas Iscariot's kiss given to Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane before he betrayed him (Luke 23:48 and Matthew 26:49).  It's also known as a 'Judas kiss', meaning an insincere act of courtesy or false affection.

In Mafia circles, a kiss from the boss may indeed be a fatal omen.

The phrase is often used today in political or business contexts, meaning that certain associations or actions may prove to be the undoing of a person or organization, or the downfall of a plan or project.


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Re: The Cat's Pyjamas

Post by Stardust on 16th January 2017, 13:56

...and let's not forget Goldfinger.



Be grateful for even the smallest thing, blessings come in many disguises.
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Kiss of death

Post by Whiskers on 16th January 2017, 17:35

@Stardust wrote:...and let's not forget Goldfinger.

or the movie (the original --- not the awful 1995 one!)

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To lie on a bed of nails

Post by Kitkat on 17th January 2017, 15:59

TO LIE ON A BED OF NAILS

A situation or position, usually self-inflicted, that is fraught with a multitude of difficult problems.

The phrase refers to the spiked bed of the Hindu sadhu (ascetic or holy man), on which he chooses to sleep as a mark of spiritual devotion.  But while the spikes may not hurt the sadhu, they would be unbearable for most normal mortals.

The saying is sometimes used in its variant form, 'to lie on a bed of thorns'; both are used to describe painful situations that people have created for themselves.


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As mad as a hatter

Post by Kitkat on 18th January 2017, 14:04

AS MAD AS A HATTER

A renowned simile ever since Lewis Carroll's (1832-98) Alice in Wonderland (1865), although it can be found in W.M. Thackeray's (1811-63) Pendennis (1850) and is recorded in America as early as 1836.

The likely reason for linking hat-makers with madness is that hatters used the chemical mercurous nitrate in the making of felt hats, and its side effects can produce trembling symptoms such as those suffered in St Vitus's Dance.

It is believed that Lewis Carroll based his character on Theophilus Carter, a furniture dealer who was known locally as the 'mad hatter' because he wore a top hat and devised fanciful inventions such as an alarm-clock bed which tipped the sleeper to the floor when it was time to wake up.

It has also been suggested that the original mad hatter was Robert Crab, a seventeenth-century English eccentric who gave all his belongings to the poor and ate only dock leaves and grass.

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To make no bones

Post by Kitkat on 19th January 2017, 21:05

TO MAKE NO BONES

To be honest and direct without any risk that the statement may be misunderstood, but also sometimes used to mean to have no scruples about something.

One oft-cited source for this phrase is the world of gambling.  Dice were often known as 'bones' because they were originally made from animal bone.  Yet there is no further evidence to link the phrase to dice.

It is more likely that it has its roots in the older expression 'to find bones in something', which was used from the fifteenth century.  That phrase came from the fact that finding bones in a bowl of broth was considered troublesome, so to find bones in something came to mean to take issue with it.

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Make hay while the sun shines

Post by Kitkat on 20th January 2017, 12:12

MAKE HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES

To act promptly when the opportunity presents itself and make use of favourable circumstances. It has a similar seize-the-day meaning to the phrases 'one today is worth two tomorrows', and, as seen on a postcard, 'there's many a lemon dries up unsqueezed.'

The phrase originated when many people worked on the land, and appeared in the sixteenth century.  Before the days of the baler, cut hay was tossed about with a pitchfork before being gathered in, and then had to be left to dry in the fields, which mean that rain would spoil it.

In more recent times, it has come to be used as a justification for having fun or relaxing whenever the opportunity presents itself.

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Kitkat
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The man on the Clapham omnibus

Post by Kitkat on 21st January 2017, 08:39

THE MAN ON THE CLAPHAM OMNIBUS

The man in the street.  This typically ordinary person on the bus was invented by a law lord, Lord Charles Bowen (1835-94).  While summing up a case for negligence, he is said to have told the jury, 'We must ask ourselves what the man on the Clapham omnibus would think.'

The phrase was first officially recorded in the law courts in 1903, when it was quoted by Sir Richard Henn Collins MR (1842-1911) in a libel case.

In Bowen's time, the omnibus was still a horse-drawn carriage and Clapham was a nondescript suburb judged to represent ordinary London.


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To move the goalposts

Post by Kitkat on 22nd January 2017, 11:39

TO MOVE THE GOALPOSTS

A colloquial expression derived from football meaning to change the agreed conditions or rules for carrying out a plan, quite often in business when clients change their minds after work on a project has already begun.

Seen in The Guardian, 1 March 1989, about the imposition of a new railway line in Kent:

The people of Kent vote solidly for the Conservative Party ...
Why are these people, therefore, trying to move the goalposts after the football match has started?



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My giddy aunt

Post by Kitkat on 23rd January 2017, 10:31

MY GIDDY AUNT

An exclamation of surprise, a mild oath.

It has been suggested that the expression derives from the archetypal saga of giddy-auntdom, the classic farce Charley's Aunt by Brandon Thomas (1856-1914), first performed in 1892:  'I'm Charley's aunt from Brazil -where the nuts come from.'  'Oh my sainted aunt' is another variant.

However, there seems to have been a fashion at the end of the nineteenth century for using the word 'giddy' in a hyperbolical sense and this too is significant.  In Rudyard Kipling's (1865-1936) Stalky & Co (1899) we find:  'King'll have to prove his charges up to the giddy hilt.'

This specific use of 'giddy' in the phrase suggests something or someone lightheartedly or exuberantly silly; a sense of the word that dates from the sixteenth century, as in the expression to act the giddy goat.* 
Although 'giddy' has been used for hundreds of years in this sense, at first it literally meant to be possessed by a god, but later shifted to its modern sense of experiencing vertigo or dizziness.



* TO ACT THE GIDDY GOAT

To fool around.  Goats are known for their unpredictable behaviour.

In the literal sense, 'giddy' means 'insane' orto be 'possessed by a god', but it has been used to mean 'silly' or 'foolish' since the early Middle Ages.

In Latin, 'goat' is caper; goats are noted for their frisky nature.  'To cut a caper' means 'to skip or leap about playfully'.

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To add insult to injury

Post by Kitkat on 24th January 2017, 16:20

TO ADD INSULT TO INURY

To hurt, by word or deed, someone who ha already suffered an act of violence or injustice.   The expression has been in use for centuries.

During the Augustan era, the so-called Golden Age of Latin literature (27 BC-AD 14), Phaedrus translated Aesop's (620-560 BC) fables into Latin verse, peppering them with anecdotes of his own.He quotes the fable about a bald man who tried to swat a fly that had bitten him on the head, but who missed the insect and instead gave his pate a sharp slap.

Whereupon the fly said, 'You wished to kill me for a mere touch.  What will you do to yourself since you have added insult to injury?'

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To take an early bath

Post by Kitkat on 25th January 2017, 10:17

TO TAKE AN EARLY BATH

This euphemism comes from the football pitch, and means to retire early to the dressing room after being sent off by the referee, or being injured during a match (of football or rugby).

Football has been around in the UK since at least 1170 and the original game was generally bloody and brutal, but in 1863 the Football Association was establishec as a governing body of the game.  In 1881, it introduced a new law stating that if a player was guilty of 'ungentlemanly behaviour', the referee could order him off the ground.

By the time club football had become firmly established in the 1920s and 1930s, and clubs had their own facilities for the players, it was customary for the players to share a bath together after the match and thus the phrase arose.

By the 1950s, radio and TV commentators of both soccer and American football in the US were using the expression.

It passed into more general use to describe any situation in which someone is obliged to pull out of the action before it is over.  In America, and increasingly in this country, 'to take a bath' means to suffer any kind of defeat or serious loss, as in 'he took a bath in the stock market collapse', while the original phrase has evolved with the times into 'to take an early shower'.
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To be taken for a ride

Post by Kitkat on 26th January 2017, 11:51

TO BE TAKEN FOR A RIDE

This colloquial phrase can be interpreted in one of two ways. It refers either to the victim of a light-hearted joke, prank or con, or - in its sinister and probably original meaning, a completely genuine use of the phrase - to someone who is taken for a ride somewhere and does not come back in one piece, if at all.

The rival underworld gangs of major American cities in the 1920s and 1930s were virtually at war with each other, and any unfortunate who was unlucky enough to tempt the wrath of the gang leader, or Don in the case of the Mafia, would be literally taken for a ride in a limousine, ostensibly to discuss certain matters or sort out some misunderstanding.  He would be very unlikely to return alive, however - or, indeed, to return at all.


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That takes the biscuit!

Post by Kitkat on 27th January 2017, 16:52

THAT TAKES THE BISCUIT!

An exclamation to indicate shock and surprise at some action that has gone beyond the bounds of expectation.

Specially spiced biscuits and cakes were formerly prized as small treats and were given as rewards in a variety of competitions.  This phrase is thought to be a derivation of 'that takes the cake', which in the Deep South of America in the 1920s referred to a winning performance at a cake walk.

This version of the phrase may predate cake walks by several thousand years, however, as there is evidence to suggest that 'taking the cake' was synonymous with taking victory as early as the fifth century, when 'cakes' were small pyramids of grains and honey.

In The Knights, Aristotle (384-322 BC) wrote:  'If you surpass him in impudence, then we take the cake.'

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Kitkat
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To talk turkey

Post by Kitkat on 28th January 2017, 15:26

TO TALK TURKEY

To discuss some subject frankly or seriously.

The origin of the expression is uncertain, but it is thought to date back to nineteenth-century America and may have arisen from the efforts of turkey hunters to attract their prey by making gobbling noises.  The birds would then either emerge from their cover or return the call, so revealing their whereabouts.

At the turn of the last century, the turkey was considered an amusing bird, and conversations in which one 'talked turkey' were convivial.  A young suitor's chat-up lines would also be called 'talking turkey', perhaps becuse in a fit of nerves he might become tongue-tied and his words would come out like gobbling noises.

Later, the meaning became more serious and related to stern admonitions.

Incidentally, turkeys do not come from Turkey, but from North America, and were brought to Spain from Mexico.

Benjamin Franklin suggested the turkey should be the emblem of the United States of America - however, the bald eagle was chosen instead.

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To throw in the sponge

Post by Kitkat on 29th January 2017, 10:44

TO THROW IN THE SPONGE

To throw in, or throw up, the sponge means to give up, to admit defeat.  The metaphor is from prize-fighting, which predated modern boxing, and refers to a second from the boxer's corner tossing a sponge, used to refresh his contestant in between rounds, towards the centre of the ring, to signify that his man is beaten.

'To thow in the towel' also means to concede defeat in boxing, for a second might also literally throw a towel into the ring to show that the game is up.

    Current date/time is 19th April 2018, 16:22