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The Irish Thread

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Kitkat
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Tue 17 Mar 2015 - 15:30

St Patrick's Day celebrations around the world

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Homesick

Post by Kitkat on Thu 9 Apr 2015 - 15:48

... and still in a reminiscent mood ........

I grew up in the Showband dancehall era in Ireland.
Unbelievable to know that some of these guys that I used to dance to are still going strong to this day.






Aah, the memories ....
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Fri 3 Jul 2015 - 22:57

Dedicated to kk.

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The Irish Chekhov

Post by Kitkat on Fri 2 Oct 2015 - 13:42

Brian Friel: Famed playwright dies aged 86

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-34424041

Known as  known as "the Irish Chekhov", Brian Friel was acknowledged as one of the great playwrights of his generation.  In 2006 he was presented with a gold torc, in recognition of his election as a Saoi, a wise one, by the members of Aosdána.


OBITUARY
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Apple should repay Ireland €13bn, European Commission rules

Post by Kitkat on Tue 30 Aug 2016 - 12:12

Ireland should recover up to €13bn (£11bn) from Apple in back taxes, the European Commission has ruled.
After a three-year investigation, it has concluded that the US firm's tax benefits are illegal.

The Commission said Ireland enabled the company to pay substantially less than other businesses, in effect paying a corporate tax rate of no more than 1%.

Ireland and Apple both said they disagreed with the decision and would appeal against it.

Apple reaction: Live updates
Apple tax ruling 'a serious blow'
Rory Cellan-Jones: EU takes on Apple, Ireland and the US

"Member states cannot give tax benefits to selected companies - this is illegal under EU state aid rules," said Commissioner Margarethe Vestager.

"The Commission's investigation concluded that Ireland granted illegal tax benefits to Apple, which enabled it to pay substantially less tax than other businesses over many years," she added.

The standard rate of Irish corporate tax is 12.5%. The Commissions's investigation concluded that Apple had effectively paid 1% tax on its European profits in 2003 and about 0.005% in 2014.

Ms Vestager said that the tax agreement reached between Ireland and Apple meant that the company's taxable profits "did not correspond to economic reality".

'Profound and harmful effect'


Apple said the decision would be harmful for jobs.

"The European Commission has launched an effort to rewrite Apple's history in Europe, ignore Ireland's tax laws and upend the international tax system in the process," the company said in a statement.

"The Commission's case is not about how much Apple pays in taxes, it's about which government collects the money. It will have a profound and harmful effect on investment and job creation in Europe.

"Apple follows the law and pays all of the taxes we owe wherever we operate. We will appeal and we are confident the decision will be overturned."

The Irish government held a similar view.
"I disagree profoundly with the Commission," said Ireland's finance minister, Michael Noonan, in a statement.
"The decision leaves me with no choice but to seek cabinet approval to appeal. This is necessary to defend the integrity of our tax system; to provide tax certainty to business; and to challenge the encroachment of EU state aid rules into the sovereign member state competence of taxation."

The investigation into Apple and similar probes into other US firms have been criticised by US authorities.

Last week, the US Treasury Department said the European Commission was in danger of becoming a "supra-national tax authority" overriding the tax codes of its member states.

Brussels was using a different set of criteria to judge cases involving US companies, the US Treasury warned, adding that potential penalties were "deeply troubling".

Apple is not the only company that has been targeted for securing favourable tax deals in the European Union.
Last year, the commission told the Netherlands to recover as much as €30m (£25.6m) from Starbucks, while

Luxembourg was ordered to claw back a similar amount from Fiat.




Analysis: Dominic O'Connell, Today business presenter


The current focus is on the size of the bill, but there are even larger issues at stake, including one fundamental question - who really runs the world, governments or giant corporations?

At present, it is difficult to tell. Individual governments appear impotent in their attempts to apply their tax laws to multinationals like Apple. They have systems designed to deal with the movement and sale of physical goods, systems that are useless when companies derive their profits from the sale of services and the exploitation of intellectual property.

In Apple's case, 90% of its foreign profits are legally channelled to Ireland, and then to subsidiaries which have no tax residence. At the same time, countries can scarcely afford not to co-operate when Apple comes calling; it has a stock market value of $600bn, and the attraction of the jobs it can create and the extra inward investment its favours can bring are too much for most politicians to resist.

There is an echo here of the tycoons of the early 20th Century who bestrode America. Andrew Carnegie, Cornelius Vanderbilt and John Rockefeller were judged so powerful that they were almost above the law, something that successive US administrations sought to curb.

The European Commission's attempt to bring Apple to heel is on the surface about tax, but in the end about the power of the multinational and the power of the state. There is more to come; Margarethe Vestager, the Danish commissioner who is leading the charge against Apple, is warming up to take on Google.

Europe versus the giants of corporate America will be a battle royale, and one that will run and run.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37220799
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BUT ... Why Ireland doesn't want to take billions from Apple

Post by Kitkat on Tue 30 Aug 2016 - 21:19

Following on from the previous post here:

Why Ireland doesn't want to take billions from Apple

August 30, 2016

The Irish government joined Apple in vowing Tuesday to appeal the European Commission's judgment that the smartphone and computing giant didn't pay the correct volume of tax to Ireland for more than a decade, a mounting bill that analysts say could constitute 19 billion euros ($21 billion) with interest.

At stake is the foundation of Ireland's multinational-dependent, export-driven economy, which has rapidly rebounded from a banking crisis and 2010 international bailout to become once again the fastest growing in Europe. Since the 1980s, successive Irish governments have made low corporate tax and other tax-avoidance measures a key part of their sales pitch to woo foreign firms to Ireland.

Today, most of the biggest names in drug making, social media and online commerce, software and other high-tech industries have made Ireland their preferred European base — in part because, as the European Commission's damning judgment has just concluded, the Irish seek to tax multinationals' worldwide profits as little as possible.

Instead, Ireland's strategy aims to keep as many foreign job creators anchored on the island as they can. The approximately 1,000 foreign companies, mostly American, on Irish soil employ 100,000 people — some 5 percent of the workforce — but generate more than nearly a quarter of Ireland's economic output. They directly pay Ireland more than 2 billion euros annually in tax, a figure dwarfed by their much larger investment in salaries (6 billion euros), infrastructure and research (3 billion euros) and Irish goods and services (4 billion euros).

If Apple were to lose its appeal, Ireland's sometimes gravity-defying growth would lose a key foundation stone as a succession of companies with similar tax deals face retroactive charges rendering the tax-efficient reputation of Ireland null and void.

But the sheer size of Tuesday's award — worth 2,800 euros ($3,150) for every man, woman and child in Ireland — creates unexpected political difficulties for the government, which briefed journalists beforehand to expect a vastly smaller sum. The money could transform Ireland; the Irish Times bills it as the equivalent of 20 new hospitals or an end to property tax for the next quarter-century.

Irish Times columnist Fintan O'Toole quipped that Ireland's tricolor flag should have an Apple logo in its center and the country now risked being defined by "the rest of the world as the tax-avoider's crazy little sidekick." He argued that Tuesday's surprisingly "eye-watering figure" of 13 billion euros meant Ireland might be wise to cash in a chip that would allow Ireland "life-changing" levels of investment in combating poverty.

"Champagne corks should be popping in government buildings with the news that 13 billion euros is owed to the state, but instead the panic button has been pressed," said Paul Murphy, an opposition Socialist Party lawmaker. "It shows the reality that the government represents the interests of major corporations instead of the majority of people in this state."

He said the Apple money was big enough to clear Ireland's gridlocked waiting list for welfare housing and eliminate a growing trend of homelessness. "Instead," he said, "the government wants to keep Apple on its $200 billion cash pile."

Finance Minister Michael Noonan said Ireland couldn't afford to be seen as a country that shafts its key investors. He compared the act to a farmer choosing to eat the seeds rather than grow the crop.

He said overturning the cash award would be essential "to defend the integrity of our tax system, provide tax certainty to business, and ... send a strong message that Ireland remains an attractive and stable location of choice for long-term substantive investment."
https://www.mail.com/int/business/markets/4574746-why-ireland-want-to-take-billions-apple.html#.1272-stage-hero1-6
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Stardust on Fri 21 Oct 2016 - 12:05

Was looking up forgotten words of a couple of songs my Dad liked to sing and found them on the following two sites.

Just for you, Kitkat, in case you don't already know them (probably unlikely, but still...).

http://www.ireland-information.com/irishmusic/irishsongs-music-lyrics-midis.htm

http://merryploughboys.com/ballads/index.html

I enjoyed looking at both of them and have saved the lyrics of the two songs I wanted.

purr



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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Sat 22 Oct 2016 - 18:20

I'm just back from Ireland...not as a nice holiday though - my father is poorly. Nice backdrop of the Mourne mountains though.
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Stardust on Sat 22 Oct 2016 - 21:17

I hope he's better soon, lar-lar.
catlick



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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Sun 23 Oct 2016 - 12:47

Looking at those links you put up, Stardust - the first link (seems to me) has probably been collated by a patriotic Irish-American!  Definitely not a true Irish person - because the first thing I noticed at top of the page, they have stuck in there the lyrics to 'All Through The Night'.  Whilst a very beautiful Celtish air and lullaby, it is most definitely a WELSH song, Welsh title 'Ar Hyd y Nos', the lyrics written by Welsh poet, John Ceiriog Hughes.
That kinda put me off looking any further, as I did notice also that some of the other titles have spelling mistakes in them (OK, that in itself would be quite acceptable and not such a big thing on its own ...) BUT the above [major] folly is unforgiveable (especially for a Welsh person!).
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Sun 23 Oct 2016 - 13:02

@lar-lar wrote:I'm just back from Ireland...not as a nice holiday though - my father is poorly. Nice backdrop of the Mourne mountains though.

It's good that you were able to get over to see your Dad, lar-lar.  That would have meant a lot to him and made him very happy.  xx
It's hard when your relatives are poorly and they are so far away and you can't see them every day.  I know from my own experience how difficult that must be for you.  At least we have the internet now, Skype and stuff can keep people close no matter where we are in the world.  Of course it's not the same thing as being there with them, but it certainly helps.
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Stardust on Sun 23 Oct 2016 - 16:46

@Kitkat wrote:Looking at those links you put up, Stardust - the first link (seems to me) has probably been collated by a patriotic Irish-American!  Definitely not a true Irish person - because the first thing I noticed at top of the page, they have stuck in there the lyrics to 'All Through The Night'.  Whilst a very beautiful Celtish air and lullaby, it is most definitely a WELSH song, Welsh title 'Ar Hyd y Nos', the lyrics written by Welsh poet, John Ceiriog Hughes.
That kinda put me off looking any further, as I did notice also that some of the other titles have spelling mistakes in them (OK, that in itself would be quite acceptable and not such a big thing on its own ...) BUT the above [major] folly is unforgiveable (especially for a Welsh person!).
Oops! Their address is in Ireland but I guess that means nothing. All I wanted was the lyrics so it was ok for me. Sorry if it got your back up, KK.
It's like here all British are usually referred to as English and that get's my goat, so I know what you mean about the song that's Welsh and not Irish.
catlick



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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Sun 23 Oct 2016 - 17:54

giggle  - Just to confirm:


"Ar Hyd y Nos" ("All through the Night") is a Welsh folksong sung to a tune which was first recorded in Edward Jones' Musical and Poetical Relics of the Welsh Bards (1784). The Welsh lyrics were written by John Ceiriog Hughes.


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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Mon 24 Oct 2016 - 10:22

He's better than he was so thank you.


Can't beat the Irish accent....


This is what I'm used to but it took me a long,long time to understand my sister-in-laws southern accent.
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Mon 24 Oct 2016 - 10:25

Nice viewing.

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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Mon 24 Oct 2016 - 13:56

@lar-lar wrote:it took me a long,long time to understand my sister-in-laws southern accent.

Did you have trouble understanding my accent, lar-lar?
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Wed 26 Oct 2016 - 20:22

No...you speak quite slow for an Irish woman.  :thumb:
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Feather on Thu 27 Oct 2016 - 13:51

I hope your Dad continues to improve, Lar. I know what a worry it is when a loved one is not well and it's worse when you are far apart. xx.



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The Magdalene Asylums

Post by Kitkat on Fri 6 Jan 2017 - 18:31

Steve Humphries' Sex in a Cold Climate , a documentary denouncing the Magdalene Asylums, which were operated by Catholic nuns in Ireland for over 100 years, caused an uproar when it was televised in England in March 1998 as part of Channel Four's Witness series. An estimated three million people watched the documentary, one of the highest figures ever recorded for the series. A help line was set up, which received calls from almost 450 women who had experienced abuse and trauma through the Magdalene Asylums and the Catholic Church. The documentary was blacklisted by the Irish network RTE and to this date has never been officially aired in Ireland.

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Soothing interlude

Post by Stardust on Mon 27 Feb 2017 - 15:32



Sit down quietly and forget your troubles. Soothing interlude.



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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Sun 25 Feb 2018 - 1:38

update

This thread had so much stuff crammed into it, it was starting to go slow.
I've just been through it, replacing some links that are no longer available, and have unfortunately had to delete some things altogether, as some of the videos in particular were only watchable for a limited period of time. 
I hope yez all got a chance to watch them before they disappeared!
If not - well, you just don't know what ye're missing.  cleverclogs pirat
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by lar-lar on Sun 25 Feb 2018 - 21:30

To be sure, to sure, to be sure  toast
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Grave mix-up in Tipperary

Post by Stardust on Mon 26 Mar 2018 - 10:33

Grave mix-up in Tipperary:

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/family-in-dispute-with-council-after-human-remains-found-in-vacant-plot-1.3439783

Some people buried without a plot number recorded, others in a different plot to the one indicated...
...the mind boggles.

So who's buried where? Shocked



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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Sat 28 Apr 2018 - 12:46

Found this old clip from the BBC Archives, a Panorama episode broadcast in 1965 (though it really doesn't seem all that long ago to me ...  What a Face  )

1965 - Panorama: 
John Morgan reported on censorship in Ireland, including an interview with 'banned' author Edna O'Brien.


(Just click on the little volume icon down the bottom to hear the sound)

arrow right   https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/981905471719268355

... Nelson's Pillar was still standing in O'Connell Street - the following year it was blown to pieces by the IRA.  I actually heard the bomb blast go off that night, lying in my bed at home (21 miles away!).
Later that day a song was born detailing the event (as indeed most of Ireland's history is told through song). 'Up went Nelson' went straight to number one in the Irish charts and stayed there for 8 weeks!  I remember it well .... still remember it word-for-word ...




The Dubliners later made a further tribute, in 'Nelson's Farewell'  (I had this on an album somewhere):

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Jamboree
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Jamboree on Thu 3 May 2018 - 6:09

@Kitkat wrote:
... Nelson's Pillar was still standing in O'Connell Street - the following year it was blown to pieces by the IRA. 

The highlight of my first time in Dublin, on holiday as a kid when we stayed at my grandma's house in Cabinteely, was counting the steps as we climbed round and round the inside of the Pillar to reach the top where we enjoyed a spectacular view of the whole of Dublin and the surrounding mountains. I have never forgotten that day and that long climb. 168 steps to be exact. And then 168 steps all the way back down again.

In 2016 the Irish Independent commemorated the 50th anniversary of the end of the Pillar in this article: Flashback 1966: Nelson's Pillar blown up

The pillar was hollow, and its destruction spelled the end of a great Dublin tradition of climbing up the interior staircase to the top where a viewing platform afforded a spectacular view of the city. In James Joyce's Ulysses Stephen Dedalus imagines a scene where two old women spent the three-pence admission to climb the 168 steps and spit plum-stones down from the platform as they gaze up at the "one-handled adulterer".
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Re: The Irish Thread

Post by Kitkat on Thu 3 May 2018 - 11:49

@Jamboree wrote:
The highlight of my first time in Dublin, on holiday as a kid when we stayed at my grandma's house in Cabinteely, was counting the steps as we climbed round and round the inside of the Pillar to reach the top where we enjoyed a spectacular view of the whole of Dublin and the surrounding mountains.

I didn't know you had an Irish connection, Jamboree. Very Happy  

Cabinteely.  I know it well!  Not terribly far from where I lived in Newtownmountkennedy.  The bus into Dublin passed right through the main street in Cabinteely.  My secondary school was in Bray (Loreto Convent), about half way between the two.  Bray is in Co. Wicklow.  Once you passed through the main street in Bray, the far end was the beginning of Dublin county.


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